How can a training program reduce ACL injuries? Will this additional routine make you more likely to become injured?

Many athletes are sidelined because of injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).  But how can they be prevented?  Researchers now believe that specific types of training can reduce the risk of injury to the ACL. But how can a training program reduce ACL injuries? Also, will this additional routine make you more likely to become injured? We take a look at the facts below.

Why ACL injuries occur

The ACL is the primary stabilizing ligament in the knee, and comes into play when you change direction to carry out rotational movement. That explains why ACL injuries are common in athletes in sports such as football, hockey, and basketball.

How can a training program reduce ACL injuries?

Several ACL injury prevention training programs have been developed in recent years, including a 9 week hip and trunk program by researchers in Australia. The program consisted of resistance, balance, and plyometric exercises.

The program was able to reduce stress on the knee,increase lower extremity strength,and boost performance levels. There was a noticeable reduction in the incidences of ACL injury among the athletes that participated in the program. The results confirmed that targeted training programs can reduce ACL injuries.

Will this additional routine make you more likely to become injured?

These types of training programs increase the flexibility of the joints, so that they are able to absorb shock more easily. As a result, you are not likely to become injured because of the additional workout.

Contact orthopedic surgeon Frank McCormick, MD,of the LESS Institute, South Florida, to find out more about training programs to reduce ACL injures. The LESS Institute has offices in Miami, Orlando, West Palm Beach, Doral, and Boca Raton. Call 866-956-3837 to schedule a consultation (learn more).

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